Getting published

There are a variety of ways health and social care staff can share their experiences to benefit others. This guidance focuses on publishing in journals.

The content is also available in downloadable PDF format.

Introduction

There are many reasons why you might want to publish for example

  • You have an interesting and/or innovative story
  • To educate others
  • To share your clinical work, your research or your experience
  • To provoke debate
  • To change practice
  • Professional development
  • Status, recognition and sense of achievement for the individual or team
  • Adding to the existing body of literature
  • You want to make a difference in practice
  • In educational institutions, you must publish or perish it is different in the NHS but this means you are less likely to be given dedicated time to write
  • Ethical duty to share your findings to benefit others

The important point is to be clear why YOU are writing the paper and want to get it published.

It is hard work but worth the effort as it is rewarding to see your work in print.

Questions to ask yourself:

  1. WHY are you writing it?
  2. WHO are you writing it for (target audience)?
  3. WHERE do you aim to publish?
  4. WHAT do you need to do?

Skills for learning at work provides guidance on ways to get knowledge used in practice and alternative ways to share knowledge.